Zoketsu Norman Fischer (b. 1946)

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clyde
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Zoketsu Norman Fischer (b. 1946)

Post by clyde » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:14 am

Zoketsu Norman Fisher is a Soto Zen priest. I’ve attended almost a dozen of his one-day retreats and years ago participated in a Practice Period as a non-residential student. His sangha is Everyday Zen (http://www.everydayzen.org).

I’ve listened to many of his talks, too many to recommend one; so, here is a link to his 100s of talks:

http://everydayzen.org/teachings/

Find one on a subject of interest and listen.
“Enlightenment means to see what harm you are involved in and to renounce it.” David Brazier, The New Buddhism

“The most straightforward advice on awakening enlightened mind is this: practice not causing harm to anyone—yourself or others—and every day, do what you can to be helpful.” Pema Chodron, “What to Do When the Going Gets Rough”

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Re: Zoketsu Norman Fischer (b. 1946)

Post by clyde » Thu Jan 09, 2020 10:42 pm

“Buddha spent his life talking to people. Like Socrates, he was one of the greatest masters of talking to people in recorded history. One gets the sense in the sutras that the Buddha talked not because he was particularly loquacious, or because he was given to elaborate explanations, but in order to help people see through the smokescreen of their own language and views. Once someone asked him for his secret in answering questions as effectively as he did. He said that he had four ways of answering questions: one way was categorically—simply to say yes or no without ambiguity. The second way was to examine the question analytically, clarifying definitions of terms, trying to determine what was actually being asked, usually by deconstructing the question. Most of the time when the Buddha employed this method, there was no need to answer the question: under analysis the question proved meaningless. The third way was by posing a counterquestion, whose purpose was to bring the questioner back to his or her own mind, redirecting attention away from the entanglement of the language of the question to something real that stood behind it. The fourth way was simply by putting the question aside, because some questions are so hopelessly entangled that to take them up on any terms at all would be to get stuck in them like flypaper—which doesn’t help. Trying to answer these questions is like trying to get through a wall by beating your head against it—it is ineffective and you get a sore head. To put the question aside is to walk around the wall without beating your head bloody. This way you do get to the other side, which is after all the important thing. So sometimes the Buddha’s response to a question was silence.”
Norman Fischer, posted on Facebook today
“Enlightenment means to see what harm you are involved in and to renounce it.” David Brazier, The New Buddhism

“The most straightforward advice on awakening enlightened mind is this: practice not causing harm to anyone—yourself or others—and every day, do what you can to be helpful.” Pema Chodron, “What to Do When the Going Gets Rough”

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Re: Zoketsu Norman Fischer (b. 1946)

Post by Spike » Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:24 am

. . . And, of course, kindly advice on how to effectively and maybe helpfully participate on this forum. Even the very last part!

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