assisting dying/suffering animals.

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jundocohen
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by jundocohen » Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:30 am

Believe me that it is not just the little bird, or the several cancer and feline AIDS beloved cats I have accompanied for "putting to sleep" at the Vets over the years ...

... with people too, I had to make the decision for my own mother that we would suspend further medical treatment that (maybe) would have given some more time, my several years of volunteer work in the care center of a Hospice holding the hands and feeding ice cream to so many folks who were not alive the next week or day (some so young), and my own cancer this year when I thought about how I would want to finish things if it got really bad ...

All of it breaks my heart, each and every time. I cry, and I am not ashamed about it. I cry for my mother of course, but even for the little cats. After all these years of Zen Practice, I do not believe in birth and death in the least. And yet I believe in birth and death fully. My first Zen Teacher in Japan, Azuma Roshi of Sojiji, used to cry a bit when he recalled his late wife, then tell us that life is like a dream.

Gassho, J
Last edited by jundocohen on Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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fuki
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by fuki » Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:10 am

jundocohen wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:30 am
After all these years of Zen Practice, I do not believe in birth and death in the least. And yet I believe in birth and death fully. My first Zen Teacher in Japan, Azuma Roshi, used to cry a bit when he recalled his late wife, then tell us that life is like a dream.
:111:
meldpunt seksueel misbruik in boeddhistische gemeenschappen.
https://meldpuntbg.nl/

IZIhttp://www.zeninstitute.org/en/iziae/main.html

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jundocohen
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by jundocohen » Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:01 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:30 am
Believe me that it is not just the little bird, or the several cancer and feline AIDS beloved cats I have accompanied for "putting to sleep" at the Vets over the years ...

... with people too, I had to make the decision for my own mother that we would suspend further medical treatment that (maybe) would have given some more time, my several years of volunteer work in the care center of a Hospice holding the hands and feeding ice cream to so many folks who were not alive the next week or day (some so young), and my own cancer this year when I though about how I would want to finish things if it got really bad ...

All of it breaks my heart, each and every time. I cry, and I am not ashamed about it. I cry for my mother of course, but even for the little cats. After all these years of Zen Practice, I do not believe in birth and death in the least. And yet I believe in birth and death fully. My first Zen Teacher in Japan, Azuma Roshi, used to cry a bit when he recalled his late wife, then tell us that life is like a dream.

Gassho, J
Just to be clear in the case of my mother, it is not "euthanasia" of course, but these days with the state of modern medicine, decisions that have to be made about treatment, machines, resuscitation, steps which can afford a little extra time but much discomfort, morphine and "upping" the morphine within legal limits to hasten the end, withholding food and water ... the line is very thin.
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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[james]
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by [james] » Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:43 pm

Thanks for clarifying Jundo.
Caodemarte and Fuki, thank you as well.

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michaeljc
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by michaeljc » Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:33 pm

Most of us have (or will) have an experience: both my mother and sister wasting slowly away with cancer

My Mother was an optimist. There is a story about her going to church in a pretty dress as a little girl. She vomited all over her dress in the car, looked up at her mum and said, "There is none on my hat!"

As a mere skeleton during her long ordeal she looked at her stick-of-an-arm and said, "I have put on some weight" Ha! :lol:

She taught me to always make the best of what we have got. It is often more than we realise

m

Caodemarte
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by Caodemarte » Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:54 pm

With modern medicine most of us have been there or will be there.

The Japanese poet and lay Buddhist priest Kobayashi Issa (1763-1828) wrote on the death of his son
露の世は露の世ながらさりながら
Tsuyu no yo wa tsuyu no yo nagara sari nagara
The world of dew —
A world of dew it is indeed,
And yet, and yet . . .”

Another translation, if I recall correctly:

This saha world
is a saha world.
And yet,
And yet....

You can almost hear the heartbreak. Who can escape it? And yet....

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Dan74
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by Dan74 » Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:52 pm

Beautiful thread.

Many bows for sharing...

_/|\_

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boda
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by boda » Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:09 pm

michaeljc wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:33 pm
Most of us have (or will) have an experience: both my mother and sister wasting slowly away with cancer

My Mother was an optimist. There is a story about her going to church in a pretty dress as a little girl. She vomited all over her dress in the car, looked up at her mum and said, "There is none on my hat!"

As a mere skeleton during her long ordeal she looked at her stick-of-an-arm and said, "I have put on some weight" Ha! :lol:

She taught me to always make the best of what we have got. It is often more than we realise

m
Sounds like she had a good sense of humor, in addition to the beautiful optimism.

Took five years for cancer to take down my mom, not to brag or anything, she was on chemo the whole time. She was pretty stoic about it all, which I admired.

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michaeljc
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Re: assisting dying/suffering animals.

Post by michaeljc » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:27 am

When I go
guard well my tomb
grasshopper
Issa

I came across this many years ago and found it to be particularly beautiful

m

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