Books

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fuki
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Books

Post by fuki » Sat Jul 11, 2020 3:04 am

If people want to share books they're reading this is the place, a few weeks ago started reading this one...on page 64 so not much to share other then it's good to re-visit yogacara expedients integrating them in daily life. Perhaps I'll share something later or if other ppl want to share/ask something about this book or yogacara, or share something from your current read.
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jundocohen
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Re: Books

Post by jundocohen » Sat Jul 11, 2020 3:37 am

That is an excellent book, and does much to modernize Yogacara views to bring them in line with understandings of modern psychology and how self-identity arises in the human brain/mind.

I just read an interesting paper you may enjoy. I don't agree with all the conclusions, but the attempt to tie yogacara with Zen meditation was food for thought (and non-thought) at least ... free for download, like the seeds of the storehouse ...

Distinguishing Sōtō and Rinzai Zen: Manas and the Mental Mechanics of Meditation
Rui Zhu
Philosophy East and West


https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... Meditation

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fuki
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Re: Books

Post by fuki » Sat Jul 11, 2020 3:53 am

Thanks for sharing Jundo, got the pdf and will read it later. :)

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desertwoodworker
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Re: Books

Post by desertwoodworker » Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:01 am

This is something that my teacher Sheng Yen encouraged all of us to study.

He said, in so many words, that:

"If there is any 'Philosophy' of Ch'an, it is in Yogacara, and Madhyamika".

So, he taught us these, and we studied them with him.

But they are only icing on the cake, if you care. You see, if you, yourself, awaken, you don't need to see these old texts: They are right before you in the most enabling and most original way. You might as well write them yourself. But, you'll be too busy saving sentient beings, for the most part.

--Joe

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fuki
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Re: Books

Post by fuki » Thu Jul 16, 2020 2:08 am

Joe, yes though interestingly whatever read/studied/listened to "lately" helps me relate better or function better in my relations, kind of interesting, finally found a motivation to read, though never been a big reader...on page 68 now :lol:

GG's talks have been most helpful in relating with beings, and also tapping into the body, the head space also seems to be activated mostly in respons, not much of a narrative...well apart from this report ;)

p22
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Re: Books

Post by p22 » Sat Jul 18, 2020 5:56 am

One of the best books I've read this year-



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desertwoodworker
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Re: Books

Post by desertwoodworker » Wed Jul 22, 2020 1:43 am

Wonderful, it's all "Nature".

Some would say, "all Zen".

OK!

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Crystal
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Re: Books

Post by Crystal » Fri Jul 24, 2020 12:21 pm

.

Not a Zen book, but its well worth reading:

"A Monk's Guide to Happiness - meditation in the 21st century" by Gelong Thubten.

https://www.gelongthubten.com/books

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Autumnday
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Re: Books

Post by Autumnday » Fri Jul 31, 2020 2:44 am

Master Sheng Yen was a great Chan Master but an even greater practitioner.
Master Sheng Yen - His Shadow - MV theme song by Tang Na
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7fwBIw0Kmk
Once you have seen the Movie of Master Sheng-Yen's life, or before you do: Read the book: Footprints in the Snow: The Autobiography of a Chinese Buddhist Monk

Autumnday
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Re: Books

Post by Autumnday » Sun Aug 02, 2020 4:45 pm

i]Tending the Fire: Through War and the Path of Mediation[/i] by Ralph Steele.
Sacred Life Publishers c. 2014 by author.

Mr. Steele wrote the most powerful and direct book about the strength of his belief and living his Buddhist practice. There are three main themes within this book: integration, faith, and letting go. Mr. Steele presents his life in a nonlinear fashion using flashbacks that he incorporates into the present moments of his life. This intermingling of past and present is the force that powers him through his journeys in Myanmar and Thailand. This outer journey propelled him into an inner voyage that drove him to seek direction and guidance.

Integration is the opposite of segregation. Steele grew up in the world of segregation, in the states of South Carolina and Alabama. As a practicing member and teacher in the Vipassana Meditation Community, he realized that he could not accept that he was the only Person of Color during meditation retreats, and the other teachers were or played oblivious to this fact.

“In the fall, I was teaching at the Lama Foundation near Taos, New Mexico, with Jack Kornfield, and I brought this concern about people of color to him. I said it as clearly as I could. ‘Jack, something’s got to change. None of the leading teachers are doing anything about the imbalance. If I continue, I ‘ll‘’ have to be some kind of closet practitioner. Sitting here, feeling isolated at a big retreat, it’s just too weird.’ (Steele 196)

Ralph Steele and Jack Kornfield discussed the facts that separate retreats for women were begun in the 70s and during the 80s, gay men also felt safe and supported in their own retreats. Mr. Kornfield supported Mr. Steele’s concerns and discussed this problem with other teachers in the Vipassana Communities. The Inter-Racial Buddhist Council was created to bring people of color into the mediation communities.

The Interracial-Buddhist Council partially addressed integration concerns, and community members and the wider teaching and nonteaching communities did not openly accept and support People of Color attending Meditation Retreats. Although there was a glimmer of hope, Spirit Rock Meditation Center and the Insight Mediation Society invited community teachers and administrators to address concerns at a Nation-Wide Meeting. The meeting was not well attended and those that did attend expressed mostly negativity for holding People of Color Retreats. “The Inter-racial Buddhist Council lasted until the mid-90’s and its presence stimulated a few non-residential retreats taught by Jack Kornfield, Julie Wester, Michele Benzamin-Mild, and Ralph Steele. Token support among influential teachers did continue. In 1998 Mr. Steel received Financial support from the Pond Foundation to hold a People of Color Retreat. Jack Kornfield continued to build support for P.O.C. Retreats and this support grew slowly while Mr. Steele was a monastic in Asia.

In chapter 17, Boot Camp, Mr. Steele describes many adventures and adjustments in learning how to absorb the Culture of the International Monastery of Wat Pah Nanachat. Upon his arrival, he quickly learned that he would need to learn to discipline his mind. Ajahn Jayasao first greeted him. “Thank you for your letter. Was you traveling rewarding and growthful?” I said “yes” out loud and then to myself, “if only you knew?” He said, “I do,” I said to myself, “Shit!” And quickly worked at becoming stone quiet (p. 214) He realized that Ajahn Jayasao’s mind was so disciplined that he could read Steele’s mind. Faith, that practice could lead to a far greater discipline of mind than he currently had, propelled Steele onward.

After being welcomed, Ralph was escorted to his new place of residence, his kuti. Upon arriving at his kuti; he was introduced to his new meditation teacher-the mosquitoes. “The mosquitoes at Wat Pah Nanachat were small and gentle. They felt warm fuzzies around you, and their wings looked almost luminous. Perhaps that’s one of the consequences of cultivating concentration-one, perceives things as they truly are. After all, there is a quality

of light that’s generated from anything that has a beautiful heart. My mind was far removed from the thought of killing. It is so surprising that training the mind can do that.” Steele (p. 216) Faith in the practice grew with even the seemingly mundane experience of mosquitos, which was so different from the experience of an undisciplined mind encountering mosquitos.

Mr. Steele’s actions and choices teach the importance of letting go with love and compassion and not grasping or hanging on to people and events. It is in his ability to let go that he can pick them up again in a more healthy and powerful way. Through his travels, Mr. Steele learns to relinquish himself. He learned that he is more reliable when he realizes that everyone and everything else is a part of him.

Steele’s original plan was to take Robes for a year, investigate the monastic way of life and then return to America. During his travels, he became closer and fonder of monastic culture. Disrobing became an inner conflict within. His mind took him back to his days on Paley Island, his joyous days in Japan-while a young man, and his vow to support his newly found son. His mind told him that disrobing was an insult to his community and his growth in practice and the higher consciousness that he began this journey to find. His mind and values once again softly argued that “staying at the monastery was a way of not accepting my responsibilities in the world.” (p.257) As a result, Steele decided to let go his desire to continue in monastic culture and returned to take care of his family members and to start his teaching practice to benefit others.


The teaching of impermanence is an essential teaching in Buddhism. Mr. Steele’s sharing of his life encourages his readers to transform their lives to touch the lives of others.

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