Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Anything at all goes here. Keep it clean.

Moderator: Spiritual Do-gooder

User avatar
daibunny
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2017 12:58 pm

Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by daibunny » Tue Feb 06, 2018 5:00 am

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 092902.htm

I really question this, because on a personal level i think it makes me less reactive, but i have no comment, just wanted to offer it up for discussion.

Also i found this, been thinking about a vr headset and if i could get a hands free controller that would certainly seal the deal :)

Yoga, meditation may help train brain to help people control computers with their mind
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 132559.htm
The bridge is flowing, not the water.

~Shenxiu

User avatar
guo gu
Posts: 96
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2017 5:18 am
Location: tallahassee, florida
Contact:

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by guo gu » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:34 am

no data come to us neutral. everything comes to us already theorized, framed with a particular agenda. so a lot of it has to do with how the "study" is conducted, its parameters, scope; the participants, etc.

my two cents.
guo gu

User avatar
jundocohen
Posts: 604
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:30 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by jundocohen » Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:41 am

The main criticism seems to be, again, the low quality in method of the studies on meditation themselves. The headline is misleading ...
The most unexpected result of this study, though, was that the more positive results found for compassion had important methodological flaws -- compassion levels in some studies only increased if the meditation teacher was also an author of the published report.

Overall, these results suggest that the moderate improvements reported by psychologists in previous studies may be the result of methodological weaknesses and biases, said the researchers.

Their research -- published today in Scientific Reports -- only included randomised controlled studies, where meditators were compared to other individuals that did not meditate ...

... "Despite the high hopes of practitioners and past studies, our research found that methodological shortcomings greatly influenced the results we found. Most of the initial positive results disappeared when the meditation groups were compared to other groups that engaged in tasks unrelated to meditation. We also found that the beneficial effect of meditation on compassion disappeared if the meditation teacher was an author in the studies. This reveals that the researchers might have unintentionally biased their results.

"None of this, of course, invalidates Buddhism or other religions' claims about the moral value and eventually life changing potential of its beliefs and practices. But our research findings are a far cry from many popular claims made by meditators and some psychologists.

"To understand the true impact of meditation on people's feelings and behaviour further we first need to address the methodological weaknesses we uncovered -- starting with the high expectations researchers might have about the power of meditation."
It is much like the methodological flaws and biases shown in the vast majority of studies on meditation and health benefits, as we recently discussed.

viewtopic.php?f=6&t=138&p=1366&hilit=studies#p1366

In any event, I believe that Zazen (Shikantaza), combined with the Precepts, Loving Kindness Practice and the like sure helps make us gentler, more other-directed and caring individuals ... even if it won't make us saints. It takes angry people and helps them be less angry, it takes sad people and helps them be less sad and, if someone has the "right stuff" to start with, I have seen it turn some people into very very good, saintly individuals too.

But the evidence is anecdotal, very hard to measure. I just came across a quote today where Jon Kabat Zinn admitted about 25 years ago that these studies have great flaws, and the situation has not improved much (top of page 97 here):

https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=3uq ... nn&f=false

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

User avatar
daibunny
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Nov 01, 2017 12:58 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by daibunny » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:45 am

jundocohen wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 10:41 am

It is much like the methodological flaws and biases shown in the vast majority of studies on meditation and health benefits, as we recently discussed.


Well lets not throw the baby out with the bath water. Compassion is a subjective quality and hard to quantify.

For instance, i know a woman who makes a bleating noise every time she sees a picture of a baby or hears just about anything positive about anyone or anything sad about anyone. Is she displaying compassion and empathy or being nice in service of a social role she wants to project?
If she is being nice, its possible that a meditation practice might make living up to the social role less important, make her reactions more honest and less reactive, and to the observer (depending on expectations) she might appear less compassionate.

The second link i posted in the OP was something quantifiable as are many of the benefits of meditation and if you can replicate it, its science, its as true as anything else, and all we have as a basis to engage objective reality.
Last edited by daibunny on Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
The bridge is flowing, not the water.

~Shenxiu

User avatar
fuki
Posts: 1723
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:02 am
Location: Zandvoort, The Netherlands

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by fuki » Tue Feb 06, 2018 11:54 am

guo gu wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:34 am
no data come to us neutral. everything comes to us already theorized, framed with a particular agenda. so a lot of it has to do with how the "study" is conducted, its parameters, scope; the participants, etc.

my two cents.
guo gu
Agreed, it's like letting people taste your ice cream on a very hot summer day and then saying "studies show that" 95% of the people picked our ice cream as the best they ever had" it's not against the law unfortunately, I believe Iceland is the only country where it is against the law.
There are constant new "scientific" studies about everything, one day a carrot can give you cancer the next day it prevents cancer to exaggerate.
Always check the motive (I never read studies so I can't get suggestively manipulated anyway) :mrgreen:
meldpunt seksueel misbruik in boeddhistische gemeenschappen.
https://meldpuntbg.nl/

IZIhttp://www.zeninstitute.org/en/iziae/main.html

User avatar
Great Sage EofH
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:55 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by Great Sage EofH » Wed Feb 07, 2018 12:31 am

No reason to expect inexperienced meditators to show deep character improvement. The study is flawed because it lumps all experience levels together. It should actually result in what thy got. Flawed hypothesis, flawed result.
"We are magical animals that roam" ~~ Roam

User avatar
lobster
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2017 10:47 am

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by lobster » Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:28 am

Study finds meditation may not make you a better person
When as 'not better' as me :evil: every little helps :116: and my experience is it helps sufficiently. So the study can be the basis for a better study to include:

Sila, yoga and tai chi, mantra, prostrations, teacher adjustment. :115: In fact everything that entails a way of life rather than mindfulness, TM, walking meditation, fasting, eating well ... or whatever is the one tiny fad effort that has minimally measurable improvement ... :waving:

Personally I find being more compassionate and generally excellent, unflawed and Mary Poppins like (perfect in every way) needs a degree of concentration that is best left to Sangha or the terminally saintly :bow2:

:namaste: :hatsoff:

User avatar
Great Sage EofH
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:55 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by Great Sage EofH » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:03 am

On the other hand anyone anywhere can see significant character improvement by consciously working on 108 major defilements while practicing Zazen correctly, no matter what the pundits say
"We are magical animals that roam" ~~ Roam

User avatar
fuki
Posts: 1723
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:02 am
Location: Zandvoort, The Netherlands

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by fuki » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:13 am

SunWuKong wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:03 am
On the other hand anyone anywhere can see significant character improvement by consciously working on 108 major defilements while practicing Zazen correctly, no matter what the pundits say
What do you mean by consciously working Sir Eric?
meldpunt seksueel misbruik in boeddhistische gemeenschappen.
https://meldpuntbg.nl/

IZIhttp://www.zeninstitute.org/en/iziae/main.html

User avatar
Crystal
Posts: 159
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:40 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by Crystal » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:45 am

More information about the study in the first link in the OP #1 can be found here......

"The limited prosocial effects of meditation: A systematic review and meta-analysis"

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-20299-z

Here's an excerpt from the introduction:

‘If every eight-year-old in the world is taught meditation, the world will be without violence within one generation’ — this quote, attributed to the current Dalai Lama, and circulating on online forums, tweets and Facebook pages, succinctly conveys the beliefs and expectations held by many about the powers of meditation. These vary considerably, from supernatural abilities (e.g., telepathy) to psychological states of peacefulness. Beliefs in the Western world about the powers of meditation became widely spread in the 1970s through the Transcendental Meditation movement, a technique where one sits quietly and focuses on the mental repetition of a Sanskrit short word. The popularisation of Buddhist-based mindfulness meditation in the last two decades has further helped to promote the belief that meditation can be practiced as a faith-free method of inducing significant positive changes in consciousness.

Personally I'm rather skeptical about "studies" and "surveys," and also about unverifiable statements such as the one above which is attributed to the Dalai Lama . :103:

.

Caodemarte
Posts: 420
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2017 7:02 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by Caodemarte » Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:09 pm

Crystal wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:45 am
....Personally I'm rather skeptical about "studies" and "surveys," and also about unverifiable statements such as the one above which is attributed to the Dalai Lama . :103:
I share your doubts on both accounts. For discussion purposes, let us say the survey is right.

I am trying to be physically fit. If zazen does not make me physically fit and I have to continue to exercise, how would this affect my practice? It would only affect it if my goal in zazen was to use it primarily as a physical practice. For example, I believe zazen has incidental therapeutic side effects. If my main goal was therapeutic, I would enter therapy as there are more effective methods for that goal. Learning that zazen did not have therapeutic side effects would be surprising, but would have no effect on my practice.

User avatar
Great Sage EofH
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:55 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by Great Sage EofH » Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:46 pm

fuki wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:13 am
SunWuKong wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:03 am
On the other hand anyone anywhere can see significant character improvement by consciously working on 108 major defilements while practicing Zazen correctly, no matter what the pundits say
What do you mean by consciously working Sir Eric?
Typically 108 defilements have attachment at the first position in the list. Most obstructions that arise as we sit involve our karmic attachment/aversion etc. to “something” - part of the “letting go” process is recognizing what is happen in relation to these things. So for example, if I experience Lust, I look at it and say “lust has arisen” - then either it’s going to be an obstruction, in which case I’m never fully aware of it (denial) or if I fully grok it, I can choose to be free of it or not free of it, but consciously accept the consequences. Accepting the consequences of what we choose to hold on to, or not hold on to is the conscious intention and thsts’s the conscious work. Subconsciously, Zazen practice creates a workable garden, as opposed to a tangle of weeds.

Similarly, addiction and alcoholism treatment using meditation works the same way, meditation gives us respite, but also it encourages a conscious recognition of our situation to progress.

Comment encouraged on this, mostly I’m shooting from the hip. I think it’s a modus operandi to take awareness to places it rarely goes, like tying ourselves to the mast. The most significant event in my practice was staying awake and aware wherever it leads.

Comments welcome. It’s just my feeling about things.
"We are magical animals that roam" ~~ Roam

User avatar
boda
Posts: 554
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:27 am

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by boda » Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm

guo gu wrote:
Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:34 am
no data come to us neutral. everything comes to us already theorized, framed with a particular agenda. so a lot of it has to do with how the "study" is conducted, its parameters, scope; the participants, etc.

my two cents.
guo gu
Indeed that is what this story is about, that the positive results shown in previous studies were apparently biased or otherwise false. See the bolded portion of a quote from the story below.
Despite the high hopes of practitioners and past studies, our research found that methodological shortcomings greatly influenced the results we found. Most of the initial positive results disappeared when the meditation groups were compared to other groups that engaged in tasks unrelated to meditation. We also found that the beneficial effect of meditation on compassion disappeared if the meditation teacher was an author in the studies. This reveals that the researchers might have unintentionally biased their results.
jundocohen wrote:But the evidence is anecdotal, very hard to measure.
The results were derived from research so it's not anecdotal.

---

I really don't understand why anyone would assume that the practice of meditation would help to produce a better person.

If anyone is serious about discussing this I think we should first try to define what a "better person" is.

User avatar
fuki
Posts: 1723
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2017 12:02 am
Location: Zandvoort, The Netherlands

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by fuki » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:59 pm

SunWuKong wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:46 pm

Typically 108 defilements have attachment at the first...
[SPOILER]
position in the list. Most obstructions that arise as we sit involve our karmic attachment/aversion etc. to “something” - part of the “letting go” process is recognizing what is happen in relation to these things. So for example, if I experience Lust, I look at it and say “lust has arisen” - then either it’s going to be an obstruction, in which case I’m never fully aware of it (denial) or if I fully grok it, I can choose to be free of it or not free of it, but consciously accept the consequences. Accepting the consequences of what we choose to hold on to, or not hold on to is the conscious intention and thsts’s the conscious work. Subconsciously, Zazen practice creates a workable garden, as opposed to a tangle of weeds.

Similarly, addiction and alcoholism treatment using meditation works the same way, meditation gives us respite, but also it encourages a conscious recognition of our situation to progress.

Comment encouraged on this, mostly I’m shooting from the hip. I think it’s a modus operandi to take awareness to places it rarely goes, like tying ourselves to the mast. The most significant event in my practice was staying awake and aware wherever it leads.
Comments welcome. It’s just my feeling about things.
Thanks Eric for the description, I was wondering what you meant since "working consciously" could mean anything from psychotherapy to Buddhist methods.
No comment on it, how we work and practise will always vary a bit dependend on the practisioner, sounds good.
meldpunt seksueel misbruik in boeddhistische gemeenschappen.
https://meldpuntbg.nl/

IZIhttp://www.zeninstitute.org/en/iziae/main.html

User avatar
jundocohen
Posts: 604
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:30 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by jundocohen » Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:52 am

bodhi wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm
jundocohen wrote:But the evidence is anecdotal, very hard to measure.
The results were derived from research so it's not anecdotal.
I meant that my experiences, and what I have seen in teaching others, is only anecdotal.

The quality of the studies on meditation, however, is very hit and miss. A lot of miss.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

User avatar
lobster
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Nov 21, 2017 10:47 am

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by lobster » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:38 am

bodhi wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm

I really don't understand why anyone would assume that the practice of meditation would help to produce a better person.

If anyone is serious about discussing this I think we should first try to define what a "better person" is.
A bettered person is one who experiences less ignorance, internal and external story projection and less dukkha. :hatsoff:

We all knew that, even the joke zeniths ... :114:

:116: ... meanwhile studies are known to be worth studying ...

... and now back to the indefinable ... :107:

User avatar
boda
Posts: 554
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:27 am

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by boda » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:23 pm

lobster wrote:
Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:38 am
bodhi wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm

I really don't understand why anyone would assume that the practice of meditation would help to produce a better person.

If anyone is serious about discussing this I think we should first try to define what a "better person" is.
A bettered person is one who experiences less ignorance, internal and external story projection and less dukkha. :hatsoff:
In English?

User avatar
boda
Posts: 554
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2018 5:27 am

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by boda » Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:24 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:52 am
bodhi wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm
jundocohen wrote:But the evidence is anecdotal, very hard to measure.
The results were derived from research so it's not anecdotal.
I meant that my experiences, and what I have seen in teaching others, is only anecdotal.

The quality of the studies on meditation, however, is very hit and miss. A lot of miss.

Gassho, J
Do you acknowledge your own bias in this estimation?

User avatar
jundocohen
Posts: 604
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 2:30 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by jundocohen » Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:59 pm

bodhi wrote:
Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:24 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:52 am
bodhi wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 6:28 pm
jundocohen wrote:But the evidence is anecdotal, very hard to measure.
The results were derived from research so it's not anecdotal.
I meant that my experiences, and what I have seen in teaching others, is only anecdotal.

The quality of the studies on meditation, however, is very hit and miss. A lot of miss.

Gassho, J
Do you acknowledge your own bias in this estimation?
On the question of my personal life experiences, and my appraisal of the effects on others in our Sangha, yes. It is a personal appraisal, thus anecdotal.

On the question of quality in scientific studies of meditation, no. Structural problems with methodology in the vast majority of studies (such as those done under TM auspices) are now well known.
Don’t Believe the Hype
Neuroscientist Catherine Kerr is concerned about how mindfulness meditation research is
being portrayed in the media.

Last May, an article about mindfulness on a popular mainstream news website finally spurred
neuroscientist and meditation researcher Catherine Kerr to act. The article cited 20 benefits of
meditation, from “reducing loneliness” to “increasing grey matter” to “helping sleep,” and painted a
picture of meditation as a kind of golden elixir for modern life. Kerr posted the article on her Facebook
page. “It is not like any of this is grossly inaccurate,” she wrote in her post. “It is just that the studies
are too cherry-picked and too positive.” ...

What are some of the popular myths or narratives about mindfulness that scientists
would like to correct? Scientists are, for the most part, circumspect about making claims for cures
attributed to mindfulness. The science doesn’t support that. Scientists know from looking at
meditation trials that not every person benefits from mindfulness therapies, but this is something
non-scientists seem to have difficulty with. Individuals should not make clinically based decisions
based only on neuroscientific studies because the sample sizes are too small

... There’s a broader replication crisis in medicine. There is a very famous article about this by John P. A.
Ionnidis called “Why Most Published Research Studies Findings are False.” In the same vein,
areport published in Nature reviewed preclinical cancer studies and found that over 80 percent of the
findings reported in top journals were nonreplicable. That means we can’t trust them. They’re likely
not true!
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/research/divi ... lness).pdf
BJPsych Bull. 2016 Dec; 40(6): 329–332.
doi: 10.1192/pb.bp.116.053686
PMCID: PMC5353526
Has the science of mindfulness lost its mind?


Something has gone wrong with the science of mindfulness. The literature on its supposed mental and physical benefits is conceptually and methodologically precarious and has been divulged in a sensationalist way. Academic articles describe weak results as ‘encouraging’ and ‘exciting’; popular best-selling books about mindfulness, many of which are written by researchers, are bursting with magical promises of peace, happiness and well-being. The replacement of orange-robed gurus by white-collared academics who speak of the benefits of ‘being in the present moment’ is a powerful social phenomenon, which is probably rooted in our culture's desire for quick fixes and its attraction to spiritual ideas divested of supernatural elements. There is a misrepresentation of the place and value of meditation in the Buddhist tradition, including its depiction as a purely rational method of self-exploration,2 which would feel alien to countless past generations of Buddhists.3

There are two major types of problems with the attempts to study mindfulness. First, its scientific literature is plagued by conceptual and methodological shortcomings and the turning of a blind eye to the fact that individuals react differently to this technique. Second, we also have concerns about how it is being utilised by individuals with little formal training in mental health, and its branding (often against the alarming background of a global increase in mental illness) as the technique of choice to develop ‘mental fitness’. Our aim is not to engage in a damning critique of mindfulness, but simply to urge caution about its widespread use as a therapeutic technique, including its limitations, the lack of clear evidence about its benefits, and its ‘assembly-line’ approach based on a reductive understanding of the human mind.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5353526/

Scientific American: Is Meditation Overrated?
The scientific evidence is scant for many of the practice's widely touted benefits

https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... overrated/

Goyal argues the lackluster results simply reflect the fact that there is not enough evidence to reach other conclusions, in part because funds for high-quality meditation research are hard to come by. “That's part of the reason why the trials that we're seeing have relatively small sample sizes, and many of them have problems with their quality,” he says. Plus, meditation may provide broad lifestyle benefits that go beyond treating disease and are thus difficult to measure. Allan Goroll, a professor of medicine at Harvard University, who published a commentary in the journal at the same time, hopes that the results—or lack thereof—“will be a stimulus for scientists to address these questions in a scientific way,” he says. “We need to apply the scientific method to therapies both conventional and unconventional so we can find out what works.
Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

User avatar
Great Sage EofH
Posts: 351
Joined: Fri Nov 10, 2017 12:55 pm

Re: Study finds meditation may not make you a better person

Post by Great Sage EofH » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:18 am

https://www.umassmed.edu/cfm/research/publications/

Publications

van Lutterveld, R., van Dellen, E., Pal, P., Yang, H., Jan Stam, C., Brewer, J. A., (2017) “Meditation is associated with increased brain network integration” NeuroImage (in press).

Crane, R.S., Brewer, J. A., Feldman, C., Kabat-Zinn, J., Santorelli, S., Williams, J. M. G., Kuyken, W., (2017) "What Defines Mindfulness-Based Programs? The Warp and the Weft.” Psychol Medicine 47: 990-999.

Levoy, E., Lazaridou, A., Brewer, J. A., Fulwiler, C., (2016) “An Exploratory Study of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction for Emotional Eating” Appetite 109: 124-30.

Fulwiler, C., Siegel, J. A., Allison, J., Rosal, M., Brewer, J. A., King, J. A., (2016) “Keeping Weight Off: study protocol of an RCT to investigate brain changes associated with mindfulness-based stress reduction.” BMJ Open 6: e012573. doi:10.1136/ bmjopen-2016-012573

van Lutterveld, R., Houlihan, S. D., Pal, P., Sacchet, M. D., McFarlane-Blake, C., Patel, P. R., Sullivan, J. S., Ossadtchi, A., Druker, S., Bauer, C., Brewer, J. A., (2017) “Source-space EEG neurofeedback links subjective experience with brain activity during effortless awareness meditation” NeuroImage 151(1): 117-27.

Kober, H., Brewer, J. A., Height, K. L, Sinha, R. (2017) “Neural Stress Reactivity Relates to Smoking Outcomes and Differentiates between Mindfulness and Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments” NeuroImage 151: 4-13.

Chung, T., Noronha, A., Carroll, K. M., Potenza, M. N., Hutchison, K., Calhoun, V. D., Gabrieli, J. D. E., Morgenstern, J., Nixon, S., Wexler, B. E., Brewer, J. A., Ray L., Filbey, F., Strauman, T. J., Kober, H., Feldstein Ewing, S. W., (2016) “Brain Mechanisms of Change in Addiction Treatment: Models, Methods, and Emerging Findings.” Curr Addict Rep 3(3): 332-42.

Loucks, E. B., Britton, W. B., Howe, C. J., Gutman, R., Gilman, S. E., Brewer, J. A., Eaton, C. B., Buka, S. L. (2016) “Associations of dispositional mindfulness with obesity and adiposity: the New England family study” Int J Behav Med 23(2):224-33.

van Lutterveld, R.,Brewer, J. A., (2015) “Neurofeedback from the Posterior Cingulate Cortex as a Mental Mirror for Meditation” Biofeedback 43(3):117-120.

Good, D., Lyddy, C., Glomb, T., Bono, J., Brown, K. W., Duffy, M., Baer, R., Brewer, J. A., Lazar, S. (2015) “Contemplating Mindfulness at Work: An Integrative Review.” Journal of Management (in press).

Brewer, J. A. and Pbert, L., (2015) “Mindfulness: An emerging treatment for smoking and other addictions?” J. Fam. Med. 2(4): 1035.

Fulwiler, C., Brewer, J. A., Sinnott, S., Loucks, E. B., (2015) “Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Weight Loss and CVD Risk Management” Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports 9(10):1-8.

Loucks, E. B., Schuman-Olivier, Z., Britton, W. B., Fresco, D. M., Debordes, G., Brewer, J. A., Fulwiler, C. (2015) “Mindfulness and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: State of the Evidence, Plausible Mechanisms, and Theoretical Framework” Current Cardiology Reports 17:112.

Loucks, E. B., Britton, W. B., Howe, C. J., Gutman, R., Gilman, S. E., Brewer, J. A., Eaton, C. B., Buka, S. L. (2015) “Associations of dispositional mindfulness with obesity and adiposity: the New England family study” Int J Behav Med (in press).

Van Dam, N. T., Brown, A., Mole, T. B., Davis, J. H., Britton, W. B. and Brewer, J. A. (2015) “Development and Validation of the Behavioral Tendencies Questionnaire.” PLoS ONE 10(11): e0140867. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0140867.

Garrison, K. M., Zeffiro, T. A., Scheionost, D., Constable, R. T., and Brewer, J. A. (2015) “Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task” Cognitive Affective Behavioral Neuroscience (in press).

Garrison, K. M., Pal, P., Rojiani, R., Dallery, J., O'Malley, S. S., and Brewer, J. A. (2015) “A randomized controlled trial of smartphone-based mindfulness training for smoking cessation: a study protocol” BMC Psychiatry, 15:83.

Brewer, J. A., (2014) “Mindfulness in the Military.” Am. J. Psychiatry 171: 803-6.

Garrison, K. M., Scheinost, D., Constable, R. T., Brewer, J. A. “Neural activity and functional connectivity of loving kindness meditation.” Brain and Behavior PMC: 4(3) 337-347. open access journal

Brewer, J. A. Garrison, K. M., and Whitfield-Gabrieli, S. (2013) "What about the 'self' is processed in the posterior cingulate cortex?" Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7: 647

Garrison, K. M., Santoyo, J. F., Davis, J. H., Thornhill IV, T. A., Thompson, Kerr, C. E., Brewer, J. A. (2013) "Effortless awareness: using real-time neurofeedback to probe correlates of posterior cingulate cortex activity in meditators’ self-report." Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7: 440.

Schuman-Olivier, Z., Hoeppner, B., Evins, A. E., Brewer, J. A. (2013) "Finding the right match: Mindfulness training may potentiate the therapeutic effect of non-judgment of inner experience on smoking cessation." Substance Use and Misuse (in press).

Brewer, J. A. and Garrison, K. M. (2014) "The posterior cingulate cortex as a plausible mechanistic target of meditation: Findings from neuroimaging." Annals of NYAS 1307(1): 19-27. (Download PDF)

Garrison, K. M., Scheinost, D., Worhunsky, P. D., Elwafi, H. M., Thornhill IV, T. A., Thompson, E., Saron, C., Desbordes, G., Kober, H., Hampson, M., Gray, J. R., Constable, R. T., Papademetris, X., J. A. Brewer. (2013) "Real-time fMRI links subjective experience with brain activity during focused attention." NeuroImage 81:110-118.

Elwafi, H. M., Witkiewitz, K., Mallik, S., Thornhill, T. A., Brewer, J. A., “Mechanisms of mindfulness training in smoking cessation: moderation of the relationship between craving and cigarette use.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 130(1-3): 222-29.

Brewer, J. A., Davis, J. H., Goldstein, J. (2013) "Why is it so hard to pay attention, or is it? Mindfulness, the factors of awakening and reward-based learning." Mindfulness 4: 75-80. (Download PDF)

Brewer, J. A., Elwafi, H. M., Davis, J. H. (2013) “Craving to Quit: psychological models and neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness training as treatment for addictions.” Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 27 (2): 366-79. (Download PDF)

Libby, D. J., Worhunsky, P. D., Pilver, C. E., J. A. Brewer. (2012) “Meditation-induced changes in high-frequency heart rate variability predict smoking outcomes.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:54.

Brewer, J. A., P. D. Worhunsky, J. R. Gray, YY Tang, J. Weber, H. Kober. (2011) "Meditation experience is associated with differences in default mode network activity and connectivity." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

Brewer, J. A., S. Mallik, T. A. Babuscio, C. Nich, H. E. Johnson, C. M. Deleone, C. A. Minnix-Cotton, S. Byrne, H. Kober, A. Weinstein, K. M. Carroll, B. J. Rounsaville. (2011) “Mindfulness Training for smoking cessation: results from a randomized controlled trial.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Brewer, J. A., Smith, J. T., S. Bowen, G. A. Marlatt, M. N. Potenza, (2010) "Applying Mindfulness-Based Treatments to Co-Occurring Disorders: What Can We Learn From the Brain?" Addiction (in Press).

Brewer, J. A., R. Sinha, J. A. Chen, R. N. Michalsen, T. A. Babuscio, C. Nich, A. Grier, K. L. Bergquist, D. L. Reis, M. N. Potenza, K. M. Carroll, B. J. Rounsaville (2009), "Mindfulness Training and Stress Reactivity in Substance Abuse: Results from A Randomized, Controlled Stage I Pilot Study." Substance Abuse 30 (4): 306-17.

Brewer, J. A., J. E. Grant, and M. N. Potenza. (2008) "The Treatment of Pathologic Gambling." Addictive Disorders and Their Treatment 7(1): 1-13.

Brewer, J. A. and M. N. Potenza. (2008) "The neurobiology and genetics of impulse control disorders: Relationships to drug addictions." Biochemical Pharmacology 75: 63-75.

Brewer, J. A., P. D. Worhunsky, K. M. Carroll, B. J. Rounsaville, M. N. Potenza (2008) “Pre-Treatment Brain Activation During Stroop Task is Associated with Treatment Outcomes in Cocaine Dependent Patients.” Biological Psychiatry (11): 998-1004.

Grant, J., E., J. A. Brewer, M. N. Potenza, (2006) “Neurobiology of Substance and Behavioral Addictions.” CNS Spectrums 11(12):924-30.
"We are magical animals that roam" ~~ Roam

Post Reply