Wonderful, No Place to Go

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jundocohen
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Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by jundocohen » Wed Jun 10, 2020 1:42 am

.
The idea appeared in Buddhism somewhere that the goal of Zen practice is eventually to feel peaceful, fearless, beautiful and wonderful 24/7/365.

Perhaps, when we are all perfect Buddhas, this world left behind, it is so. However, so long as we have these human bodies, I don't feel that it can always be so ... not if we are to truly live in this life. Still, that does not mean that the teachings of fearlessness, peace, beauty and wonder are not true!

Rather, there is a path to feeling wonderful about not always feeling wonderful, even when sometimes downright scared or blue. It is wonderful to feel wonderful sometimes, and wonderful to feel anything but wonderful sometimes. This is the wonder of life. One can sense the timeless that is also the ticking clock of 24/7/365 and passing years. One can see a certain beauty and light shining through even the world's sometime oh so ugly and dark moments. We can be at total peace when peaceful and total peace even when life does not give us a drop of peace ... peaceful with not always being peaceful ... peaceful yet not peaceful at once, as one. We can know the taste of nothing to fear and nothing possible to lose even while afraid and shaking sometimes, fearless about sometimes being afraid. In other words, one can be free and pure even while sometimes up to one's neck in burdens and mud.

Sometimes people write me to say that, some days, they do not feel wonderful, and are so afraid or sad that they cannot sit Zazen those days.

We sit Zazen each day, nothing to gain and nothing lacking. But some days, when we just can't and are unable, this is Zazen too. Sunny days are so because of the sometime rain. Do not expect the skies to be always sunny. Nonetheless, do not forget that the sky is always clear, bright, open and boundless whether seen or unseen, even when hidden by the clouds. We sit to realize such fact, we trust in such truth even on the stormiest days. Come back to sitting when you can, and realize this fact. Perhaps this practice is to learn to see when we see clearly, but also to see clearly even at those times we cannot see well at all.

----

A couple of other folks wrote me to say that they were very upset sometimes about having physical limitations, unable to move about and go where they want freely. They wanted to travel and visit with loved ones, take a walk in a famous place, but could not. I have been there too. I wish I could give them young and healthy legs.

Instead, the only thing that we Zen folks can offer is the wisdom to go where you can, for the whole world is there. Nothing to be missed, and a treasure right here.

So, no need to go to and walk in a far off garden if you can see a garden from your front porch or in a nearby field where you do not need to walk so.

Be content to swim where you can. Remember the lines from the Genjo Koan ...

A fish swims in the ocean, and no matter how far it swims there is no end to the water. A bird flies in the sky, and no matter how far it flies there is no end to the air. ... When their activity is large their field is large. When their need is small their field is small. Thus, each of them totally covers its full range, and each of them totally experiences its realm.

In other words, just go where you can and savor that. I can neither fly like a bird nor swim as well as a fish because I do not have wings or gills. I am just satisfied with that fact.

Gassho

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by jundocohen » Wed Jun 10, 2020 6:38 am

I saw a fellow post elsewhere on line that Zazen had brought them "inner peace, calmness, silence and joy, a still and even tempered mind." That is wonderful!

But none of that is truly necessary to Shikantaza Zazen.

I like to remind folks often that Shikantaza is perfect sitting both when we feel inner peace, calmness, silence and joy, a still and an even tempered mind, and when we do not. Strange as it is to say, the True (caps) Peace, Calmness, Silence, Joy, Stillness and Even Temper is a Peace so Peaceful that it fully holds all the passing moments of small human feeling peaceful and moments of not feeling very peaceful sometimes. It is a Joy to have a smile on one's face, and a Joy to sometimes feel a tear roll down one's cheek. It is a Calm that holds all worldly calm and storms beyond measure, an Even that is smooth roads and bumpy, a Silence which is both quiet and noise, a Stillness in the face of both not moving an inch and life's biggest earthquakes. Like that.

Shikantaza Zazen is --not-- meditating. It is not "meditating" because we sit in RADICAL goallessness in which there is nothing to attain, nothing lacking or more needed, but the sitting of sitting itself. Yes, we let thoughts go, do not grab on or become tangled in thoughts. Yes, a nice balanced posture is best so that we can also forget about the body and just let it go too. However, even if we sit for some minutes ... forget about time too, and let measuring go. Zazen is not a matter of time, thus we sit for certain lengths of time.

Why do we sit this way?

The answer is very simple: In the delusion of life, we live always feeling we have to "do" something, that something is missing or needs adding, that we need to ponder and judge, that there are endless goals to obtain, things to fix, people to see and places to be. that time is money and more more more is better than less. We feel that we must turn sadness to happiness, war to peace, sickness to health, chaos to calm. Zazen is not that. Zazen is sitting as the one place to be, the one action needed in that time of sitting, nothing lacking and no other place to be or go. It is a "non-tool" for "non-fixing" beyond fixing or not fixing. Zazen is the way a Buddha sits sitting Buddha to sit Buddha sitting.

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by Larry » Wed Jun 10, 2020 10:02 am

“I encourage all you superior seekers in the secret depths to devote yourself to penetrating and clarifying the self, as earnestly as you would put out a fire on the top of your head. Should you desire the great tranquility prepare to sweat white beads.”

Hakuin :mrgreen:

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by avisitor » Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:08 am

jundocohen wrote:
Wed Jun 10, 2020 6:38 am
Shikantaza Zazen is --not-- meditating. It is not "meditating" because we sit in RADICAL goallessness in which there is nothing to attain, nothing lacking or more needed, but the sitting of sitting itself. Yes, we let thoughts go, do not grab on or become tangled in thoughts. Yes, a nice balanced posture is best so that we can also forget about the body and just let it go too. However, even if we sit for some minutes ... forget about time too, and let measuring go. Zazen is not a matter of time, thus we sit for certain lengths of time.
I saw this post in another forum.
Still it sounds like propping up one mthod higher than another.
Meditation is just another side of the same coin
There is nothing to attain, no goal, nothing lacking or needed.

It is the quality of the sitting that is of vital importance and not the method

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by jundocohen » Thu Jun 11, 2020 3:46 am

avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:08 am

I saw this post in another forum.
Still it sounds like propping up one mthod higher than another.
Meditation is just another side of the same coin
There is nothing to attain, no goal, nothing lacking or needed.

It is the quality of the sitting that is of vital importance and not the method
Hi AV,

Ah, it is a very good question. Truly, nothing in the universe is left out. Not one action in our day, nor blade of grass or bird call is left out. So, we might say that "All is Buddha, All is Zazen" in that way. So, then, why bother to sit Shikantaza?

"Meditation" means to me an activity, like all our activities in our day, which seeks some outcome, change, reward, desired product. We spend all our day going places because we want to get there, reaching for things because we desire them, making plans because we need to fix or change conditions. To the extent that our goal is blocked, the desire remains out of reach, our plans are thwarted and dissatisfaction remains with conditions, there is Dukkha. To the extent that, in our sitting practice, there is any "place to go," or gold ring to reach for, something to fix or change, dissatisfaction with present conditions, this is "meditation" as I use the term.

In turn, Shikantaza is a radical dropping of places to go, a putting aside of something else to reach for besides sitting itself, a freedom from all need to fix or change in our very trust in the wholeness of sitting.

I agree with you that there may be ways to sit which combine the two. I understand from many good sources that, for example, Koan Introspection Zazen, when truly undertaken, drops away any gold ring or need for change. However, perhaps for most kinds of "meditation" or "mindfulness" that are taught today (and even with some forms of what is being described in many quarters with the label "Just Sitting" or supposed "Shikantaza" these days), the "get more peace, get more happy, be a better whatever" predominates.

In Shikantaza, the true "Gold Ring" is to be free of need for "gold rings," and there is no place inside or outside to reach. All is complete, nothing to fix, not one grain to add or take away. Truly any action by a human being can be done with such attitude of "nothing to attain" ... from cleaning a filthy window to marching in the streets for social change, from cooking a meal to running a race. Better said, we can learn to do such actions with "goals" and "no goals" at once: Cleaning a dirty window, yet satisfied with its dirty state too; marching for social change of conditions we cannot accept, yet simultaneously accepting all current conditions; running a race toward a goal, yet experiencing each step as its own goal with no other place to be.

The problem is that, most human beings in their life, in their meditating, cleaning, marching, running here and there, just can't get it into their thick skulls that there is another way with nothing to clean, nothing to change, no place to go. They are trapped in goals and getting.

So, for us, the medicine to all that seeking, clutching, running, hoping, chasing, fleeing, wishing and wanting is just to sit for a time radically dropping all of that. This is Shikantaza. What we seek, wish and want is sitting for sitting's sake. Then, getting back up from the sitting cushion to a world of places to go, things to fix, work to do, perhaps deep in our bones we can now simultaneously experience the "no going, no fixing, no doing" of Shikantaza too, even as we run and do. "Meditation" may hide that power if it is just another excuse for "attaining, fixing, doing."

Gassho, Jundo

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by fuki » Thu Jun 11, 2020 3:58 am

Wonderful post Jundo, yes 'true meditation' is actually 'non-meditation' I always joke "I have no mind for meditation" but most don't get the reference :lol:

As long as there is a 'you' doing or not-doing, thinking or not-thinking, 'meditating' or 'not-meditating' you are no closer to home than the day you were born.
-Wei Wu Wei

However most ppl live in their heads, pick up a zen book or meet a 'teacher' and starts meditating or practise self-referentially to achieve something, I call it prerequisite practise. It's all good though.

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by fuki » Thu Jun 11, 2020 4:02 am

An excerpt from an essay of Bob called "true meditation: recognizing basic sanity;

Essentially, all meditation programs are based on a desire to have things be other than they are, different and more agreeable. All of the many supports, such as special meditation environments, special clothing and accessories (such as incense, bells, statues, pictures, and prescribed cushions), special diets and exercises, select groups and teaching aids, and various elaborate rituals and trappings, are enthusiastically employed to dress the stage with the props believed necessary or conducive to accomplishing the purposes of the particular meditation of choice. All in all, it can become a rather elaborate affair, and more often than not, such props can actually get in the way of the very liberation being sought after, primarily by confirming the solidity of the aspirant and necessity of their ritual tools.

In contrast, true meditation begins with the recognition of the two-fold emptiness of both self and phenomena, the direct realization that subjects and objects exist purely by virtue of conceptual designation. Upon their arising, all thoughts, self-images, memories, beliefs, sensations, emotions and perceptions are revealed in true meditation as impermanent and empty of substance, like holographic phantasms. There is no requirement for some special costume or ritual in true meditation, nor any strategic plan for self-transformation and personal ascendance. The one who would accomplish any of that is recognized as an imaginative figment of a fictional story right from the beginning.

In fact, true meditation is actually non-meditation, since it has nothing to accomplish, and hence requires no effort geared towards a change of state or attainment of something extra. Nothing has to be developed, fixed, or resolved, but only recognized. It adds nothing to nor subtracts anything from experience. It simply consists of being aware of being aware, or directly noticing mind’s true nature – our native awake awareness that is self-existing and spontaneously present, open and spacious, lucid and transparent, empty of any inherent substance, and yet knowing, or cognizant, of whatever arises.

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by Nothing » Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:19 am

Larry wrote:
Wed Jun 10, 2020 10:02 am
“I encourage all you superior seekers in the secret depths to devote yourself to penetrating and clarifying the self, as earnestly as you would put out a fire on the top of your head. Should you desire the great tranquility prepare to sweat white beads.”

Hakuin :mrgreen:
:namaste:
“Here it is--right now. Start thinking about it and you miss it.”
― Huang Po

https://beingwithoutself.org/retreats/

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by Nothing » Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:21 am

fuki wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 4:02 am
An excerpt from an essay of Bob called "true meditation: recognizing basic sanity;

Essentially, all meditation programs are based on a desire to have things be other than they are, different and more agreeable. All of the many supports, such as special meditation environments, special clothing and accessories (such as incense, bells, statues, pictures, and prescribed cushions), special diets and exercises, select groups and teaching aids, and various elaborate rituals and trappings, are enthusiastically employed to dress the stage with the props believed necessary or conducive to accomplishing the purposes of the particular meditation of choice. All in all, it can become a rather elaborate affair, and more often than not, such props can actually get in the way of the very liberation being sought after, primarily by confirming the solidity of the aspirant and necessity of their ritual tools.

In contrast, true meditation begins with the recognition of the two-fold emptiness of both self and phenomena, the direct realization that subjects and objects exist purely by virtue of conceptual designation. Upon their arising, all thoughts, self-images, memories, beliefs, sensations, emotions and perceptions are revealed in true meditation as impermanent and empty of substance, like holographic phantasms. There is no requirement for some special costume or ritual in true meditation, nor any strategic plan for self-transformation and personal ascendance. The one who would accomplish any of that is recognized as an imaginative figment of a fictional story right from the beginning.

In fact, true meditation is actually non-meditation, since it has nothing to accomplish, and hence requires no effort geared towards a change of state or attainment of something extra. Nothing has to be developed, fixed, or resolved, but only recognized. It adds nothing to nor subtracts anything from experience. It simply consists of being aware of being aware, or directly noticing mind’s true nature – our native awake awareness that is self-existing and spontaneously present, open and spacious, lucid and transparent, empty of any inherent substance, and yet knowing, or cognizant, of whatever arises.
Great piece :hatsoff: thanks for sharing
“Here it is--right now. Start thinking about it and you miss it.”
― Huang Po

https://beingwithoutself.org/retreats/

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by fuki » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:34 am

jundocohen wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:51 am
I might offer, though (as a ceremony minimalist in our Sangha) that some ceremonies, chants and symbols can be quite powerful. We don't force anyone to join in reciting the Heart Sutra, throwing themselves into Oryoki, reciting the Verse of Atonement or Metta and the like ... but many folks find that these pack a lesson and a wallop.

Gassho, J
Ceremony minimalist :lol:
Actually in the passing of this alloted time span I find myself to be more appreciative of certain "rituals/traditions", I incorporate them spontaneously in home-practise. It's just that often you see ppl taking much effort and pride in things like "look at my shrine, look at my clean house, look at my contracted lotus position despite my knee injury, look at my knowledge of scriptures and all such bells and smells" While never really getting it's not about a pseudo-entity and its affective fixation with Buddhism as a personality project/thought object. So in that sense ritual can be a hindrance or obstacle as an adoptation instead of an inspiration.

I agree with the powerful/transformative potential they can conduct, but same applies to mopping a floor, a perfect "expression of Buddha-Nature"

In the local Sangha here we have a tea ceremony, if the tea poors one can't say "stop" but need to perform a specific hand movement ritual to indicate to stop pooring. Not really "my thingy" but no problem going with the program ofcourse. But "silence" for me does not mean the absence of speech, so saying stop or doing the hand thingy, is both allright. I was raised at home to say "can I get you something" and saying "thank you" if I did that hand ritual with mom she'd probably not have a 'silent' respons for me :lol: I like to smile with my eyes and nod my head slightly saying "thank you" Sometimes Sanghas can be a bit "cold" or "surgical" for my taste.

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by Larry » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:47 am

avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:08 am
I saw this post in another forum.
You’re not supposed to reveal the tricks of the trade :D

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by jundocohen » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:51 am

Nothing wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 6:21 am

Great piece :hatsoff: thanks for sharing
Yes, wonderful piece.

I might offer, though (as a ceremony minimalist in our Sangha) that some ceremonies, chants and symbols can be quite powerful. We don't force anyone to join in reciting the Heart Sutra, throwing themselves into Oryoki, reciting the Verse of Atonement or Metta and the like ... but many folks find that these pack a lesson and a wallop.

Gassho, J

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by Larry » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:53 am

fuki wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:34 am
jundocohen wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:51 am
I might offer, though (as a ceremony minimalist in our Sangha) that some ceremonies, chants and symbols can be quite powerful. We don't force anyone to join in reciting the Heart Sutra, throwing themselves into Oryoki, reciting the Verse of Atonement or Metta and the like ... but many folks find that these pack a lesson and a wallop.

Gassho, J
Ceremony minimalist :lol:
Actually in the passing of this alloted time span I find myself to be more appreciative of certain "rituals/traditions", I incorporate them spontaneously in home-practise. It's just that often you see ppl taking much effort and pride in things like "look at my shrine, look at my clean house, look at my contracted lotus position despite my knee injury, look at my knowledge of scriptures and all such bells and smells" While never really getting it's not about a pseudo-entity and its affective fixation with Buddhism as a personality project/thought object. So in that sense ritual can be a hindrance or obstacle as an adoptation instead of an inspiration.

I agree with the powerful/transformative potential they can conduct, but same applies to mopping a floor, a perfect "expression of Buddha-Nature"

In the local Sangha here we have a tea ceremony, if the tea poors one can't say "stop" but need to perform a specific hand movement ritual to indicate to stop pooring. Not really "my thingy" but no problem going with the program ofcourse. But "silence" for me does not mean the absence of speech, so saying stop or doing the hand thingy, is both allright. I was raised at home to say "can I get you something" and saying "thank you" if I did that hand ritual with mom she'd probably not have a 'silent' respons for me :lol: I like to smile with my eyes and nod my head slightly saying "thank you" Sometimes Sanghas can be a bit "cold" or "surgical" for my taste.

Jundo posted at 9-51 am and you responded from the Quantum Oven at 9-34 am :lol:

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by fuki » Thu Jun 11, 2020 11:43 am

avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:52 pm
While, Fuki illuminates the process
I was just following Jundo around walking together going about to where there is no change :lol:
vlcsnap-2018-05-17-11h38m14s661.png
vlcsnap-2018-05-17-11h38m14s661.png (313.09 KiB) Viewed 1544 times

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by avisitor » Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:52 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 3:46 am
avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:08 am

I saw this post in another forum.
Still it sounds like propping up one method higher than another.
Meditation is just another side of the same coin
There is nothing to attain, no goal, nothing lacking or needed.

It is the quality of the sitting that is of vital importance and not the method
Ah, it is a very good question.
I thank you for your reply
However, did not ask a question.
You differentiate one method from another
While, Fuki illuminates the process
Larry wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:47 am
avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:08 am
I saw this post in another forum.
You’re not supposed to reveal the tricks of the trade :D
My Bad!!
Last edited by avisitor on Thu Jun 11, 2020 11:28 am, edited 6 times in total.

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by Larry » Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:12 pm

fuki wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 11:43 am
avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:52 pm
While, Fuki illuminates the process
I was just following Jundo around walking together going about to where there is no change :lol:
vlcsnap-2018-05-17-11h38m14s661.png
What’s that giant Jelly Baby on the table? :D

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by jundocohen » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:08 pm

fuki wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:34 am
jundocohen wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 8:51 am
I might offer, though (as a ceremony minimalist in our Sangha) that some ceremonies, chants and symbols can be quite powerful. We don't force anyone to join in reciting the Heart Sutra, throwing themselves into Oryoki, reciting the Verse of Atonement or Metta and the like ... but many folks find that these pack a lesson and a wallop.

Gassho, J
Ceremony minimalist :lol:
Actually in the passing of this alloted time span I find myself to be more appreciative of certain "rituals/traditions", I incorporate them spontaneously in home-practise. It's just that often you see ppl taking much effort and pride in things like "look at my shrine, look at my clean house, look at my contracted lotus position despite my knee injury, look at my knowledge of scriptures and all such bells and smells" While never really getting it's not about a pseudo-entity and its affective fixation with Buddhism as a personality project/thought object. So in that sense ritual can be a hindrance or obstacle as an adoptation instead of an inspiration.

I agree with the powerful/transformative potential they can conduct, but same applies to mopping a floor, a perfect "expression of Buddha-Nature"
Yes, anything can be and is a wonderful ritual and practice ... sweeping the floor, doing exercises for a knee injury ... if done with gaining-non-gaining mind and a sense of the sacredness of the action. When one is sweeping or moaning with a painful knee, the whole world, every blade of grass, all the buddhas and ancestors are sweeping and moaning. There is nothing to attain, nothing to clean or fix, so keep sweeping and fixing. Of course, as you say, one should not be attached with pride to the doing.
In the local Sangha here we have a tea ceremony, if the tea poors one can't say "stop" but need to perform a specific hand movement ritual to indicate to stop pooring. Not really "my thingy" but no problem going with the program ofcourse. But "silence" for me does not mean the absence of speech, so saying stop or doing the hand thingy, is both allright.


As in the military boot camp, some things are done for the simple reason of causing people to put the ego aside and commit to the group. It is a good technique for losing pride and personal attractions/aversions. Why would someone be so egotistical that they demand the right to do what they want in getting their tea? In retreat or a Zen sitting, we put aside some of the "ways I want" and follow the structure precisely because it is not always what "I want." Further, any ceremony is like a dance, and when committing to the motions of the dance, one can lose one's small self and find oneself again.

Gassho, J
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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by jundocohen » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:17 pm

fuki wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 11:43 am
avisitor wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 1:52 pm
While, Fuki illuminates the process
I was just following Jundo around walking together going about to where there is no change :lol:
vlcsnap-2018-05-17-11h38m14s661.png
Hah. Where did you find that? That is me in the slow lane during the fast paced kinhin. It was taken during Sesshin at the Nanhua Temple in Caoxi China, the temple of the 6th Ancestor, Hui-Neng, where his mummy still resides ... or what's left of it.

Image

Talk about fancy altars!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJ2PSJ0Syk0

Gassho, J

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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by fuki » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:35 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:08 pm

As in the military boot camp, some things are done for the simple reason of causing people to put the ego aside and commit to the group. Why would you be so egotistical that you demand the right to do what you want in getting your tea? In retreat or a Zen sitting, we put aside some of the "ways I want" and follow the structure precisely because it is not always what "I want." Further, any ceremony is like a dance, and when committing to the motions of the dance, one can lose one's small self and find oneself again.

Gassho, J
Sure hence I said "no problem following any program" I like bootcamp as I'm quite made/build to follow (sensible) orders, including from teachers/parents as a kid (again if sensible and "just") I actually thrive like that without the whole "option" thing. I prefer a grocery list then ppl asking me "what do you want to eat" Who cares/I don't know, just tell me what to eat! :lol: So within the sangha I never experience resistence or even a sense of following, the narrative aint there. Yet everyone is different and ppl have picked up aquired flavours along the way, so in that sense I see no issue in liking to see a tea ceremony different, when I sit with friends at home we do things a bit different then in the official sangha, no problem, at someone elses house its a bit different again.

The "ego" or "sense of self" is just fabricated software, yet part of life or the human experience, one can use it skillfully or not, its not something good or bad only the way it's used, so it doesnt automatically mean egotistical to "want" something, it can be creative, deepening (sangha) relations actually. Otherwise it is just hardware without any "juice" Anyways "ego" is also just a word, I often see it's a word thrown around easily while it doesnt mean the same to everyone, like "God" for instance. No problem putting it aside but can also just let it function freely (as it's not an entity/identity anyway) but I agree ego in the sense you put it can be disruptive or cause conflict/division, but too much "no-ego" in religious institutes can be abused or manipulated too or result in bad conduct by teachers as you know.
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Re: Wonderful, No Place to Go

Post by fuki » Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:38 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Thu Jun 11, 2020 10:17 pm
Hah. Where did you find that? That is me in the slow lane during the fast paced kinhin. It was taken during Sesshin at the Nanhua Temple in Caoxi China, the temple of the 6th Ancestor, Hui-Neng, where his mummy still resides ... or what's left of it.
You posted the video in the 'ol zenspace with the challenge of "can you find Jundo" ofcourse I love such tasks so paused the vlc player and took a snapshot. I have photo folders even back from the zfi days were I save such fun thingies :D

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