The practice of "Seiza" (?)

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The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:04 am

Jundo,

About 50 years ago, I read about a practice in Japan called "seiza" (I'll try to put my hands on this book again in the next while, but I can't be sure to turn it up).

It was just one chapter in the book, and appeared near (or at) the very end of the book.

The teacher of seiza was quoted saying many simple and rather bland but respectful and faithful things, and I think not once was any allusion made to Buddhism. The teacher put all faith and value in the practice itself, claiming all natural benefits from it, to his students. Something about this has reminded me for long about the tone that Dogen takes.

But of course the practice of this "seiza" grew up in a Zen Buddhist atmosphere, and country (I mean, I surmise that this was inevitable), and so is probably informed by it. Perhaps (?) some Zen Buddhist practitioners split-off or went independent, and, even many years ago since, pared-down to some sort of "secular" practice such as some people are more lately trying to do in the 21st Century in the West (I think of Mr. Stephen Batchelor, e.g.).

Jundo, is there any organized teaching of "seiza" in Japan now, or was there ever really any such? I don't just mean the (famous) posture, solely, but the teaching and practice of seiza, even communally, all together in a group, as a way of practice that makes no mention of Buddhism? And, how did that get started, if so? Thank you.

rgds,

--Joe

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by jundocohen » Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:55 am

desert_woodworker wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:04 am


Jundo, is there any organized teaching of "seiza" in Japan now, or was there ever really any such? I don't just mean the (famous) posture, solely, but the teaching and practice of seiza, even communally, all together in a group, as a way of practice that makes no mention of Buddhism? And, how did that get started, if so? Thank you.
Hi Joe,

Meido may have more insight on this then me, but I would say that "seiza" (the Japanese way resting on the calves and ankles, not what most Zenny westerners call "sitting seiza) is an integral part of many arts such as tea ceremony, kabuki performance, martial arts, calligraphy and, yes, monastic training in Buddhism.

That said, it would not surprise me if there were Japanese groups that would have made seiza the centerpiece practice itself, rather than just part of a larger practice. In Japan, if one looks around hard enough, one is such to find some group or somebody who is doing about whatever you might consider! :-)

A quick online search in Japanese revealed many people touting the health and spiritual effects of the posture itself (and how the Japanese are "uniquely suited" in the world to sitting such way), so I am sure it is so.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by jundocohen » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:03 am

By the way, this was all interesting. Pardon the machine translation ...

https://translate.google.co.jp/translat ... rev=search

(Above makes the point that "agura" similar to Zazen or "Indian style" was more standard in Japan for formal events such as tea until Meiji)

https://translate.google.co.jp/translat ... rev=search

https://translate.google.co.jp/translat ... rev=search
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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:13 am

Jundo,
jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:55 am
Meido may have more insight on this then me, but I would say that "seiza" (the Japanese way resting on the calves and ankles, not what most Zenny westerners call "sitting seiza) is an integral part of many arts such as tea ceremony, kabuki performance, martial arts, calligraphy and, yes, monastic training in Buddhism.
Umm, yes, thanks for the kind reply.
jundocohen wrote:That said, it would not surprise me if there were Japanese groups that would have made seiza the centerpiece practice itself, rather than just part of a larger practice. In Japan, if one looks around hard enough, one is such to find some group or somebody who is doing about whatever you might consider! :-)
Ha, ha! Yes. When I studied with Theodor Herzel Gaster at Columbia (~1974?) , we read in one seminar McFarland's, THE RUSH HOUR OF THE GODS, on the proliferation of "The New Religions" in Japan after the war. I remember some of what made the title so appropriate. Maybe that phenomenon is still going on, or has constantly been renewed. ;-)
jundocohen wrote:A quick online search in Japanese revealed many people touting the health and spiritual effects of the posture itself (and how the Japanese are "uniquely suited" in the world to sitting such way), so I am sure it is so.
Ah!, I just pulled out the book. It's von Durkheim's HARA -- THE VITAL CENTER OF MAN (1962; Allen and Unwin). The sections I recalled are in the Appendix, "Japanese Texts", in three chapters there (p. 175-208 ). 1.) by Okada Torajiro; 2.) by Sato Tsuji; 3.) by Kaneko Shoseki.

My copy is in disintegrating shape. I'll gently pull out some relevant quotes in a day or so, or other bits to discuss, or which raise questions or correspondences.

Gassho,

--Joe

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by jundocohen » Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:28 am

desert_woodworker wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:13 am

Ah!, I just pulled out the book. It's von Durkheim's HARA -- THE VITAL CENTER OF MAN (1962; Allen and Unwin). The sections I recalled are in the Appendix, "Japanese Texts", in three chapters there (p. 175-208 ). 1.) by Okada Torajiro; 2.) by Sato Tsuji; 3.) by Kaneko Shoseki.
Oh, well I happen to have the Count Karlfried Dürckheim's book right here, and it is available on line. Yes, just as you say. This is from the section about Okada Torajiro (p 175-178), apparently the founder of the "The Okada Method of Seiza Culture for Mind and Body" ...

https://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110001918324/en

The Count writes:
Another, a man of great physical and mental vitality, Ambassador K.
told me (he was then over sixty) that as a young man he had been weak
and sickly and that he owed it exclusively to Seiza1 that he was now fresh,
vigorous and in excellent health. These are but two examples out of
many.
After Master Okada's early death his work was carried on by a woman,
Dr Kobayashi, with whom I had the opportunity of practising Seiza. She
also gave me the little book 'Words of the Master' to keep with me
always on my way.
... Sayings cif Master Okada
Tanden1 is the shrine of the Divine. If its stronghold is
finely built so that the Divine in us can grow then a real
human bei~g is achieved. If one divides people into ranks
the lowest IS he who values his head. Those who endeavour
only to amass ~s much knowledge as possible grow heads
that become bIgger and so they topple over eaSily, like a
pyramid stand~ng upsi~~ d~wn. They excel in imitating
others but neIther orlgmahty nor inventiveness nor any
great work is theirs.
Next come those of middle rank. For them the chest is
mos~ important. :~ople with self-control, given to
abstmence and ascetIcIsm belong to this type. These are the
men with outward courage but without real strength.
Many of the so-called great men are in this category. Yet all
this is not enough.
But those who regard the belly as the most important
part and so have built the stronghold where the Divine can
grow-these are the people of the highest rank. They have
1 Tandtn-region .hout two inche! below the navel.
I]6
Okada T orajiro
developed their minds as well as their bodies in the right
way. Strength flows out from them and produces a spiritual
condition of ease and equanimity. They do what seems good
to them without violating any law. Those in the first
category think that Science can rule Nature. Those in the
second have apparent courage and discipline and they know
how to fight. Those in the third know what reality is.
Seiza makes use of the posture most certain to produce
people of the third category. The sorrows of humanity are
caused by loss of balance. To preserve it one has to have a
healthy body and an upright heart. These can be achieved
only 'on the way'. To reach the way means 'sitting'! If you
'sit' for two or three years you will understand.
From getting-up time until bedtime you must be awake
(on the jump). Keep your posture in Hara, come what may,
and you will be alert in the right way.
You sit for one year, two years, three years, and you
think-and so do others-that you are like one born anew.
In truth however you are just a little shoot on the way to
the development of your being. It takes fifty to sixty years
to become like the heaven-striving cedars and cypresses.
Even if the body is changed in Seiza the deepest inner
state does not change so quickly.
Keep a carp in a pond with a stone in the centre and
another of equal size with nothing in the centre. In the
pond where the stone is the carp swims round the stone all
the time and thus has its exercise without meeting resistance.
He grows more quickly than the carp in the other
pond. This is the result of endless repetition.

https://terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/Hara.pdf
Well, you know how I feel about all this, that there are good and balanced ways to sit etc., posture is important, but don't exaggerate the health and psychological and societal and cosmic effects with imagined energy systems. So, you had best ask Meido perhaps.

Gassho, J

PS - My Count Karlfried Dürckheim "Nazi" quip was off topic, so I have removed it.

https://apjjf.org/2014/12/3/Brian-Victo ... ticle.html
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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Fri Apr 20, 2018 3:05 am

Anyone else on board have experience or knowledge of seiza as a "stand-alone sitting-practice" ( ;) ) in Japan? --Joe
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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Fri Apr 20, 2018 3:12 am

hi,
jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 1:28 am
PS - My Count Karlfried Dürckheim "Nazi" quip was off topic, so I have removed it.
Roger, copy. Yes, noted.

But, you know, Seinfeld had his "Soup Nazi" on some TV episodes, and it was all in a kind of grizzly fun, there (made me uncomfortable, though, to recall the awful reality of what was being parodied).

:hatsoff:

--Joe

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by narhwal90 » Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:56 am

In the US at least, seiza was the usual posture seen in smaller meetings SGI/NSA Nichiren-land up till the mid/later 90's when most everyone started moving to chairs everywhere. I don't know if the other school's general practice has changed too. The posture was more of a tradition than an element of practice, I don't recally any particular theory associated with it OTOH willingness to adopt the posture was considered an indicator of one's commitment.

Interestingly, back in the seiza days zafu & zabuton were not used, you just sucked it up on the carpet- though some folks brought the little benches and chairs were available for those who were unable to take the position for some reason. One method to ease the ankles that I liked was taking the shoes in with you and inserting the tips underneath the ankle joints, the heel ends projecting out at right angles... it kind-of works lol.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Sun Apr 22, 2018 12:31 pm

Thanks, N.!

I haven't looked into "SGI/NSA" at all, and didn't know about peoples' customary posture(s) there. Interesting info, thanks!

The teachers quoted in the Appendix chapters of the book HARA by von Durckheim don't mention Buddhism or Buddha at all, and seem to me to base their entire secular approach on a theory of the human body. I sense, though, that their "theory" is influenced by outcomes and upshots of experience of others (and maybe themselves) in Buddhist practice environments in Japan, which could indeed include several Buddhist schools, and others.

--Joe
narhwal90 wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:56 am
In the US at least, seiza was the usual posture seen in smaller meetings SGI/NSA Nichiren-land up till the mid/later 90's when most everyone started moving to chairs everywhere. I don't know if the other school's general practice has changed too. The posture was more of a tradition than an element of practice, I don't recally any particular theory associated with it OTOH willingness to adopt the posture was considered an indicator of one's commitment.

Interestingly, back in the seiza days zafu & zabuton were not used, you just sucked it up on the carpet- though some folks brought the little benches and chairs were available for those who were unable to take the position for some reason. One method to ease the ankles that I liked was taking the shoes in with you and inserting the tips underneath the ankle joints, the heel ends projecting out at right angles... it kind-of works lol.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by narhwal90 » Sun Apr 22, 2018 1:44 pm

Personally I keep with the seiza at home (SGI) and in zen venues. I've worked with half lotus a bit- feels like like its prying my legs out of the hips lol... a matter of practice I guess. As far as seiza on zafu/zabuton, I find circulation stays with me a bit longer if I'm on a hard floor instead of the cushion, to a fair extent even with zafu. My theory is the hard floor puts all the pressure on a smaller area of ankle & calf, leaving more area to allow some circulation. On the softer cushion, the pressure is more widespread and so cuts off more circulation.. hard to say though. Regardless there is a need to be stragegic with the movements so one doesn't fall over when transitioning to kinhin/prostrations lol. Sometimes seiza in shoes helps sometimes not. Paradoxically I have seen circulation stay longer while "recreationally" sitting in seiza in my huge heavy redwings, presumably the thick shanks are taking some of the compression.

I find it an efficient method of sitting anywhere for whatever reason- it makes the entire world your practice mat :) Very beneficial to exercise the quads so you can stand in one movement w/ no hands or leaning, hold 40lbs of weights and do a few reps up and down for a some good cardio too.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Sun Apr 22, 2018 3:27 pm

N.,

Thanks again. I surely like reading about the physical practice you mention, there. Inspiring.

I have taught since 1980 a form of Buddhist Yoga, physical exercise, and self-massage that I learned from Ch'an Master Sheng Yen (probably unique to him and to his Dharma heir successors), and I have added to this body of teaching some ways that Hatha Yoga teachers have taught about encouraging the legs and hips to allow for easier and steadier sitting in varieties of Lotus posture. Very effective (these are mostly variations on head-to-knee pose, on each side separately, and holding the posture for long, about three minutes, in a relaxed way, breathing, sinking further with each breath, and always working at the "edge" of discomfort). The aim in these exercises is to lengthen (cause to grow... over time, and over continuing practice) the ligaments or other connective tissue which permits comfort in Lotus (or etc. postures).

Meido Roshi (of this forum, etc.) has good advice on posture in his book out recently.

--Joe

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by Caodemarte » Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:43 pm

desert_woodworker wrote:
Fri Apr 20, 2018 12:04 am
Jundo,

About 50 years ago, I read about a practice in Japan called "seiza" (I'll try to put my hands on this book again in the next while, but I can't be sure to turn it up).

It was just one chapter in the book, and appeared near (or at) the very end of the book.

The teacher of seiza was quoted saying many simple and rather bland but respectful and faithful things, and I think not once was any allusion made to Buddhism. The teacher put all faith and value in the practice itself, claiming all natural benefits from it, to his students. ....
This sounds like a reference to the teachings of Okado Torajiro as presented in an appendix to Hara by Karlfried Graf Durkheim.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Sun Apr 29, 2018 11:15 pm

Caodemarte wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:43 pm
This sounds like a reference to the teachings of Okado Torajiro as presented in an appendix to Hara by Karlfried Graf Durkheim.
Indeed, C., and so I wrote a couple of posts into this thread. Tnx,

--Joe

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Wed May 09, 2018 4:46 pm

I meant to post a few aphorisms of one of the three Seiza teachers whose teachings appear in the Appendix of Von Durckheim's book, Hara.

This is 2/3 of a dozen statements by Seiza teacher, Okada Torajiro.
  • "From getting-up time until bedtime you must be awake (on the jump). Keep your posture in Hara, come what may, and you will be alert in the right way."
  • "People did not know before that there was a method of developing intelligence, physical health and morality all at the same time. Therefore they laughed at my teaching."
  • "Sit quite still, breathe gently, giving out long breaths, the strength in the lower belly."
  • "Do not try to free yourself from all thoughts. Simply be watchful and keep your strength in your belly."
  • "Even if the body is changed in Seiza the deepest inner state does not change so quickly."
  • "In your head is no tanden. Do not put so much strength in your head."
  • "Breathing through the mouth is a sign of decline."
  • "Blinking is not good, it weakens the eyes."

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by narhwal90 » Thu May 10, 2018 1:31 pm

Does the book have details relating to how long one should sit in their practice, methods for working with circulation- particularly when trying to stand afterwards?

I have worked up to 40 mins or so before the discomfort is really distracting, practice seems to very slowly increase the length of sitting and gradually shorten recovery. Where possible rising to both knees and pausing until circulation resumes permits a smooth & careful rise to the feet without much fear of falling over or twisting an ankle.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Thu May 10, 2018 2:30 pm

n.,
narhwal90 wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 1:31 pm
Does the book have details relating to how long one should sit in their practice, methods for working with circulation- particularly when trying to stand afterwards?
Well, the Seiza teacher, Okada, some of whose aphorisms are quoted in the Appendix of the book (and I transcribed eight of them here, above), is quoted saying that thirty minutes is the minimum he would recommend for each period of sitting seiza. He puts it rather baldly and blandly, though, as follows:
  • "It is useless if you cannot keep it up for thirty minutes."
But of course he may mean that this is the duration of practice of someone who has been practicing a while and who has worked up to such a duration or longer; the "thirty minutes" then may be the minimum suggested "maintenance-dose" of practice per sit which will enable the results to be retained and cultivated.

In the Okada aphorisms, there is nothing about care of the legs after sitting. But Von Durkheim himself, in the bulk of the book, DOES finally write a bit in Part IV of the book, "Hara As Practice", on practical considerations in practice. For example, in Chapter 5 of Part IV, "The Practice of Right Posture", he writes, that,

"...the right practice of Hara requires first of all the discovery of a new support for holding the body upright". (p. 137)

By this he does not seem to mean any particular sort of cushion or bench, but a bodily "support" that is not based on will-power, and which comes more as a result of the practice itself.

However, I think it's necessary to use suitable cushioning below the body. But, a specifically "Seiza"-teacher would be good to consult about this. I do not have a Seiza teacher, but have had Ch'an and Zen Buddhist teachers from whom I've learned zazen and other associated practices.

One teacher -- Ch'an Master Sheng Yen -- taught a thorough-body self-massage to be done at the end of each sit, and before standing. This is what I use to this day at home (except at most practice places, where they do not practice in this way, but they rise immediately for kinhin).

You could do any sort of vigorous self-massage that you like (to invent), I suppose, with good results. Yes, there should always be feeling in the feet and legs before rising, else one is likely to have an accident, as you remark so sensibly.

I myself do not sit in seiza pose, but in a closely-meshed half-lotus posture, using a base cushion and a smaller cushion to raise the buttocks a few inches so that the knees touch the base cushion, giving essentially a "three-point-suspension". This has been my posture in Ch'an and Zen practice over 39 years of formal practice, and I very seldom sit in seiza posture except in certain Hatha Yoga asanas. So my experience is very limited!

best,

--Joe
narhwal90 wrote:I have worked up to 40 mins or so before the discomfort is really distracting, practice seems to very slowly increase the length of sitting and gradually shorten recovery. Where possible rising to both knees and pausing until circulation resumes permits a smooth & careful rise to the feet without much fear of falling over or twisting an ankle.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Thu May 10, 2018 3:57 pm

Jundo,

Can you tell me please what this book may be about?

It has "Seiza" in the title, but the cover also seems to indicate a theme about Astronomy. I'm sorry I can't read the title or subtitle. Perhaps you can help?

(I just found this image in passing, and it seemed a beautiful book cover)

Thank you,

--Joe

seiza_no_namae.jpg
seiza_no_namae.jpg (25.88 KiB) Viewed 567 times

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by narhwal90 » Thu May 10, 2018 4:51 pm

narhwal90 wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 1:31 pm

Well, the Seiza teacher, Okada, some of whose aphorisms are quoted in the Appendix of the book (and I transcribed eight of them here, above), is quoted saying that thirty minutes is the minimum he would recommend for each period of sitting seiza. He puts it rather baldly and blandly, though, as follows:
  • "It is useless if you cannot keep it up for thirty minutes."
But of course he may mean that this is the duration of practice of someone who has been practicing a while and who has worked up to such a duration or longer; the "thirty minutes" then may be the minimum suggested "maintenance-dose" of practice per sit which will enable the results to be retained and cultivated.
Eh not so sure about "useless" lol but 30 minutes seems a reasonable increment. This posture certainly needs its own training regime- at first its nearly impossible to rest full body weight on the calves much less sit that way for some interval.



desert_woodworker wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 2:30 pm

However, I think it's necessary to use suitable cushioning below the body. But, a specifically "Seiza"-teacher would be good to consult about this. I do not have a Seiza teacher, but have had Ch'an and Zen Buddhist teachers from whom I've learned zazen and other associated practices.
I like the zafu on edge between the calves so the body can rest on it. That helps extend circulation a bit longer, and if you're lucky the feet and toes project over the back edge of the zabuton which eases things too. Last session I attended I glanced around at a couple suitable moments and most were in a lotus variation but 4 or 5 were in seiza this way.



desert_woodworker wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 2:30 pm

One teacher -- Ch'an Master Sheng Yen -- taught a thorough-body self-massage to be done at the end of each sit, and before standing. This is what I use to this day at home (except at most practice places, where they do not practice in this way, but they rise immediately for kinhin).

You could do any sort of vigorous self-massage that you like (to invent), I suppose, with good results. Yes, there should always be feeling in the feet and legs before rising, else one is likely to have an accident, as you remark so sensibly.
I attended a zazen session with a Soto group that divided their 1hr session into two 30 minute blocks with a brief on-cushion stretch in between. A compact though non-decorous method of getting circulation back for such a circumstance is to shift the body to either side buttocks onto the the mat, allowing the legs to rest to the side. Its difficult to hold the body this way, usually needing a arm down for support- but recovery to seiza is quick, just a quick rotation back up onto the legs. This was the method usually seen in SGI,etc back in the day, less distracting for all concerned than stretching the legs out to the front but that was seen too at the later parts of longer chanting sessions.

lol, after the 2nd 30 minute session that Soto group immediately stands, I heard the other attendees shifting in preparation about a minute before the bell- I didn't do likewise thinking with some pleasure that I was holding my posture longer and couldn't make it off my knees.

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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by jundocohen » Fri May 11, 2018 12:49 am

desert_woodworker wrote:
Thu May 10, 2018 3:57 pm
Jundo,

Can you tell me please what this book may be about?

It has "Seiza" in the title, but the cover also seems to indicate a theme about Astronomy. I'm sorry I can't read the title or subtitle. Perhaps you can help?

(I just found this image in passing, and it seemed a beautiful book cover)

Thank you,

--Joe


seiza_no_namae.jpg
It is a children's book about a completely different "seiza" (星座), meaning star "constellation" such as the Big Dipper. As in astrology and finding non-existent shapes in patterns in the sky, both the finding of non-existent systems and patterns in the mind alone ... which is what you are discussing with most of this conversation.

Gassho, Jundo
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Re: The practice of "Seiza" (?)

Post by desert_woodworker » Fri May 11, 2018 1:32 am

jundocohen wrote:
Fri May 11, 2018 12:49 am
It is a children's book about a completely different "seiza", meaning star "constellation" such as the Big Dipper. As in astrology and finding non-existent shapes in patterns in the sky, both the finding of non-existent systems and patterns in the mind alone ... which is what you are discussing with most of this conversation.
Thanks, Roshi. I'm pleased and tickled to know this, and appreciate your ability to read the writing there.

The figured shape of the objects on the cover is reminiscent of the constellation Cassiopeia in form, but the inclusion of Sun and Moon being part of it, ...well. I thought something interesting must be going on.

Is that right?, yes?, can "seiza", so pronounced, also mean "constellation"? Of course, the writing must be different. I'll check my Kodansha.

Now, please be sure to distinguish between "Astrology" and Astronomy (I'm sure you do). In Astronomy, constellations are still useful, and still used.

Granted, high-accuracy numerical angular coordinates in Right Ascension and Declination are used to locate (find) objects in the sky when using large observatory telescopes, but every astronomer must know what is meant when reference is made, for example, to "Alpha Canis Majoris", the star Sirius, the brightest star in the sky, and quite nearby, at only about 8 light-years distance.

And when it comes to Variable Stars, we must know what is meant when someone refers to the variable "RU Lupi", in order to "get" the joke, "Are you loopy?" But, seriously, it's a famous variable-star, of the southern constellation Lupus.

The Latin genitive of the constellation name is used when referring to an object in a particular constellation.

There is much beautiful and mythological, cultural, lore associated with constellations, West and East. And star names are similarly rich with lore, and meaning.

I've been re-reading Melville's Moby Dick recently: there's a lot of Astronomy in it, I'm being reminded of (lots of Cetacean detail, too).

Wishing you well, in this time of waning of the moon. The SUN is certainly not "waning" here in the Sonoran Desert: see attached temperature graph for the month elapsed. "It's warming up", right on schedule. My tall Saguaro cacti are both in bloom (State Flower of the State of Arizona), as are my Night Blooming Cereus, which have haunting perfume. A special season!, before the real Heat Season comes on later this month, and all June. July starts the thunderstorm Monsoon, our Second Summer: One hot and dry; One hot and wet. Five seasons in all, here.

Thank you again!,

(some of my friends did not know what the hood ornament on their "Subaru" cars signified, 'til I mentioned it; nor did they know the meaning of "Subaru")

Clear skies,

--Joe

temps_Fahrenheit.gif
Temps (F) in Tucson, at 2450 feet Altitude
temps_Fahrenheit.gif (15.08 KiB) Viewed 536 times

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