A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

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jundocohen
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A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:07 pm

I happened to catch a couple of interesting science podcasts with interesting perspectives on topics of interest to Buddhists.

The first is on regrets, and how some folks wallow in the negative aspects of perceived mistakes while others make them lessons to learn from for the future ... and why we tend to do each ...

Hidden Brain: Why We Can't Shake Life's 'Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda' Moments
Amy Summerville is a professor of psychology who runs the Regret Lab at Miami University in Ohio. She says a big part of why we struggle with regret has to do with the idea of rumination.

"Rumination is having thoughts spring unwanted to mind and we're chewing them over without actually getting anything new out of them, they're just repeatedly, intrusively, becoming part of our mental landscape. What we've found is that people who have ruminative regret, tend to be the people who are experiencing the most negative outcomes."

But Summerville says that while some people experience regret negatively, it's actually one of the more hopeful emotions.
https://www.npr.org/2017/09/11/55026075 ... da-moments

I would say that our Shikantaza Practice tends to allow us to respect our mistakes honestly and take responsibility, learn from them, avoid wallowing and excessive self-flagellation but try to make amends, let ourself be human and fallible, and move on to trying not to repeat. It is a good way to be.

The other podcast is a surprising report (the last 20 minutes) on what makes heroes and altruistic behavior to risk one's life to help strangers. It makes the point that caring is vital, but being too empathetic may actually prevent such behavior. The real key to compassionate action may require a bit of emotional distance. As well, some very inspiring stories in this podcast:

Radiolab: How to Be a Hero
Neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky says there is a certain kind of empathy that leads to action. But feeling the pain of another person deeply is not necessarily what makes a hero.


http://www.radiolab.org/story/how-be-hero/

Gassho, Jundo
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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lobster
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by lobster » Sat Apr 14, 2018 6:14 am

:560: Look forward to listening to those :111:

I am reminded of the heroic Malamatiyya who are to blame for being blameless ... :114:

Basic altruism is part of our social wiring, just as improvement through reflection is an empowering dynamic.

What happens when we follow a higher Bodhisattva template? :107:

Wisdom tells me I am nothing.
Love tells me I am everything.
Between the two my life flows.

Nisargadata Maharaj
http://rogernolan.blogspot.co.uk/2009/1 ... to_11.html

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boda
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Sat Apr 14, 2018 4:56 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:07 pm
I would say that our Shikantaza Practice tends to allow us to respect our mistakes honestly and take responsibility, learn from them, avoid wallowing and excessive self-flagellation but try to make amends, let ourself be human and fallible, and move on to trying not to repeat.
Why would it tend to do this? You haven’t supported this claim in any way.

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jundocohen
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:38 pm

bodhi wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 4:56 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:07 pm
I would say that our Shikantaza Practice tends to allow us to respect our mistakes honestly and take responsibility, learn from them, avoid wallowing and excessive self-flagellation but try to make amends, let ourself be human and fallible, and move on to trying not to repeat.
Why would it tend to do this? You haven’t supported this claim in any way.
It has in my life for 30 years. It is an aspect of not becoming tangled in thoughts, not buying so much into the mind theatre or thoughts and emotional reactions about the past, and being able to release into the clarity of Emptiness. However, I have no large-scale study to back it up, and it must be anecdotal.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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boda
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Sun Apr 15, 2018 9:10 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:38 pm
bodhi wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 4:56 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:07 pm
I would say that our Shikantaza Practice tends to allow us to respect our mistakes honestly and take responsibility, learn from them, avoid wallowing and excessive self-flagellation but try to make amends, let ourself be human and fallible, and move on to trying not to repeat.
Why would it tend to do this? You haven’t supported this claim in any way.
It has in my life for 30 years. It is an aspect of not becoming tangled in thoughts, not buying so much into the mind theatre or thoughts and emotional reactions about the past, and being able to release into the clarity of Emptiness. However, I have no large-scale study to back it up, and it must be anecdotal.

Gassho, J
It may feel good ‘release into emptiness’ but honestly assessing our mistakes and learning from them does require a bit of critical thinking.

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jundocohen
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Mon Apr 16, 2018 2:32 am

bodhi wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 9:10 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:38 pm
bodhi wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 4:56 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:07 pm
I would say that our Shikantaza Practice tends to allow us to respect our mistakes honestly and take responsibility, learn from them, avoid wallowing and excessive self-flagellation but try to make amends, let ourself be human and fallible, and move on to trying not to repeat.
Why would it tend to do this? You haven’t supported this claim in any way.
It has in my life for 30 years. It is an aspect of not becoming tangled in thoughts, not buying so much into the mind theatre or thoughts and emotional reactions about the past, and being able to release into the clarity of Emptiness. However, I have no large-scale study to back it up, and it must be anecdotal.

Gassho, J
It may feel good ‘release into emptiness’ but honestly assessing our mistakes and learning from them does require a bit of critical thinking.
If you understood Zen, you would know that they are not mutually exclusive at all.

Gassho J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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boda
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:15 am

jundocohen wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 2:32 am
bodhi wrote:
Sun Apr 15, 2018 9:10 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:38 pm
bodhi wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 4:56 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:07 pm
I would say that our Shikantaza Practice tends to allow us to respect our mistakes honestly and take responsibility, learn from them, avoid wallowing and excessive self-flagellation but try to make amends, let ourself be human and fallible, and move on to trying not to repeat.
Why would it tend to do this? You haven’t supported this claim in any way.
It has in my life for 30 years. It is an aspect of not becoming tangled in thoughts, not buying so much into the mind theatre or thoughts and emotional reactions about the past, and being able to release into the clarity of Emptiness. However, I have no large-scale study to back it up, and it must be anecdotal.

Gassho, J
It may feel good ‘release into emptiness’ but honestly assessing our mistakes and learning from them does require a bit of critical thinking.
If you understood Zen, you would know that they are not mutually exclusive at all.

Gassho J
That’s what you do while on the cushion, employ your critical thinking skills? Or are you always “released into emptiness”?

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jundocohen
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:39 am

bodhi wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:15 am

That’s what you do while on the cushion, employ your critical thinking skills? Or are you always “released into emptiness”?
Ah, a very good question.

I would say that, on the cushion, all is released, we do not chase after the events of the past (what past?), engage in critical thinking nor seek to make amends (thus all amends are made in the act of sitting itself, and there is never a fault to remedy in the whole universe).

Then, getting up from the cushion, in the hustle and bustle of Samsara while also released into emptiness, we can engage in critical thinking and not thinking as one, assess our mistakes beyond all thought of measure or mistake, learn from the past although still timeless, and seek to remedy and make amends for what is broken and needs fixing (although never anything in need of fixing from the start). We might apologize and pay our debts to other people, yet no other people and all books ever balanced.

Very simple.

Thus "releasing into emptiness" and "assessing our mistakes and learning from them [by] critical thinking" are not two.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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boda
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:37 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 9:39 am
bodhi wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 4:15 am

That’s what you do while on the cushion, employ your critical thinking skills? Or are you always “released into emptiness”?
Ah, a very good question.

I would say that, on the cushion, all is released, we do not chase after the events of the past (what past?), engage in critical thinking nor seek to make amends (thus all amends are made in the act of sitting itself, and there is never a fault to remedy in the whole universe).
To make amends means to compensate or make up for a wrongdoing. This necessarily involves other people and a firm conceptual disparity between self and other. I suppose there could be unusual circumstances where the act of sitting could be compensatory for some sort of indiscretion or infraction, and in that case what you say could be true, but otherwise this amounts to daydreaming on the cushion, or daydreaming afterwards about the sitting. There's nothing wrong with that of course, if that's what you want to do.
Then, getting up from the cushion, in the hustle and bustle of Samsara while also released into emptiness, we can engage in critical thinking and not thinking as one, assess our mistakes beyond all thought of measure or mistake, learn from the past although still timeless, and seek to remedy and make amends for what is broken and needs fixing (although never anything in need of fixing from the start). We might apologize and pay our debts to other people, yet no other people and all books ever balanced.
When paying your debts just pay your debts. There is absolutely no reason to daydream about "no other people", "never anything in need of fixing", etc etc. That is all extra and probably rather unhealthy. If truly "released into emptiness," why must there be no other people or nothing in need of fixing? Are other people and things to fix soooo terrible?

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jundocohen
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Tue Apr 17, 2018 12:26 am

bodhi wrote:
Mon Apr 16, 2018 6:37 pm

To make amends means to compensate or make up for a wrongdoing. This necessarily involves other people and a firm conceptual disparity between self and other. I suppose there could be unusual circumstances where the act of sitting could be compensatory for some sort of indiscretion or infraction ...
On the cushion, there is nothing lacking and no debts to pay, no creditor or debtor.

Getting up from the cushion, get to work, reflect and make amends as one can, pay one's debts.

Not one, not two. Truly, there is no on that is not off the cushion too, nor off nor on.

Very simple.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:44 pm

jundocohen wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 12:26 am
Truly, there is no on that is not off the cushion too, nor off nor on.

Very simple.
No. Duality/non-duality is an intellection that you conflate into statements like this. It is quite unnecessary, other than to build a religious narrative of some weak sort.

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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Wed Apr 18, 2018 12:54 am

bodhi wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:44 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 12:26 am
Truly, there is no on that is not off the cushion too, nor off nor on.

Very simple.
No. Duality/non-duality is an intellection that you conflate into statements like this. It is quite unnecessary, other than to build a religious narrative of some weak sort.
Keep practicing until you experience and begin to live so, and then you will know that such is not just intellection. I believe that such is the pointed point of this place.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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boda
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:08 am

jundocohen wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 12:54 am
bodhi wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:44 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 12:26 am
Truly, there is no on that is not off the cushion too, nor off nor on.

Very simple.
No. Duality/non-duality is an intellection that you conflate into statements like this. It is quite unnecessary, other than to build a religious narrative of some weak sort.
Keep practicing until you experience and begin to live so, and then you will know that such is not just intellection. I believe that such is the pointed point of this place.

Gassho, J
Anyone can rattle off empty ‘emptiness talk’ like this. You should study Allan Watts. That guy had depth and style.

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jundocohen
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by jundocohen » Wed Apr 18, 2018 4:00 am

bodhi wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:08 am
jundocohen wrote:
Wed Apr 18, 2018 12:54 am
bodhi wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:44 pm
jundocohen wrote:
Tue Apr 17, 2018 12:26 am
Truly, there is no on that is not off the cushion too, nor off nor on.

Very simple.
No. Duality/non-duality is an intellection that you conflate into statements like this. It is quite unnecessary, other than to build a religious narrative of some weak sort.
Keep practicing until you experience and begin to live so, and then you will know that such is not just intellection. I believe that such is the pointed point of this place.

Gassho, J
Anyone can rattle off empty ‘emptiness talk’ like this. You should study Allan Watts. That guy had depth and style.
He did ... but, oh my.

Gassho, J
Teacher at Treeleaf Zendo, a Soto Zen Sangha, an online practice place for folks who cannot commute to a Zen Center due to health, living in remote areas, work or family needs. The focus is Shikantaza 'Just Sitting' Zazen http://www.treeleaf.org

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boda
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Re: A Couple of Podcasts with Interesting Stuff for Buddhists

Post by boda » Wed Apr 18, 2018 6:05 am

Tease... what are you clutching your pearls about now?

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